Tag: Digital Strategy

Ideas don’t need to be big, just portable

Digital Strategy6 Comments

Increasing media fragmentation has made it harder and harder for marketers to get their messages in font of audiences. Driven by the Internet and the abundance of choice it brings, consumers have the freedom to watch, listen and read what they want, when they want.

With so many potential touch points, you can no longer rely on a single execution to get your message across let alone guarantee that it is going to be heard.

Current research on changing media consumption shows that Australians are preferring to spend our time online than watching TV (which is probably time-shifted anyway), listening to radio or reading a newspaper. Even if we are, a smartphone, iPad or laptop is seldom far away. And online, the list of potential activities is endless whether it’s browsing your favourite sites, checking RSS feeds, instant messaging, paying bills, posting status updates or simply sending an email.

The seeds to drive attention, interest, desire and action can be planted on a multitude of platforms, each with their own unique mechanics and nuances. For instance:

Email must be personalised and timely if it’s to achieve all important clickthroughs.

Similarly, search engine marketing must be targeted and relevant based on the context of the users search.

Social media is about not marketing to your customers (in the traditional sense) but starting a conversation.

The point is it is you can’t treat them all the same. Big ideas tend to work only one way. It is not enough to take a good TV execution and shoehorn it into social media or a ‘viral video’ (with the exception of Old Spice). Ideas need to work across multiple touch points.

Marketing is now less about having the big ideas seen in Mad Men and The Gruen Transfer, and more about having lots of small ideas that can be tested and refined in parallel on multiple channels.

Don’t spend all your time and resources upfront searching for the big idea. Instead start with a touchpoint analysis of where your customers are and then see which ideas will tie them together.

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Flipping the script on campaign websites

Digital Strategy, Social Media7 Comments

“Build it, and they will come”

Or at least that was the early thinking around websites. But what history has shown us is that just because you’ve built a website doesn’t necessarily mean anyone is going to come or give a crap.

Coke’s decision to abandon the tried-and-tested formula of building one-off campaign websites and driving traffic towards that with massive advertising campaigns is perhaps the best proof of that.

Instead, Coke will reinvest to expand their social media presence on YouTube and Facebook to go where the people are rather than forcing them to go to it.

Pardon the interruption

This is a great move by Coke.

Instead of having an expectation that customers will type in a URL to visit their site, they are going where their customers are already playing thus causing the least amount of interruption. It’s a sign of respect that Coke understands how their customers behave and are willing to play in there too rather than forcing customers to come to them.

The web also isn’t getting any less crowded with well over a bajillion sites (at a guess), a hefty portion of which probably lie dormant. Especially since most campaign-specific sites are typically neglected and rarely updated once a campaign has run its course. Sure there are long-tail benefits of having a campaign website, but it’s far more effective to be where your customers are.

It’s clear that there is some real strategic thinking on Coke’s part about how social media can deliver against their business objectives and that social is no longer a novelty but a serious marketing tool.

More bang for your buck

Also on a side note, if you want to talk about accountability (not that Coke need to watch their pennies), it seems to be a better allocation of Coke’s resources to focus on building lasting relationships on a relatively inexpensive platform rather than plow wads of dough into what will most likely amount to a temporary engagement.

N.B. I’m in no way saying you should abandon your main website in favour of a Facebook fan page. Having a website that you can call your own to illustrate who you are and how you think outside the confines of someone else’s platform is a critical part of any organisation’s digital strategy.

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8 Guiding Principles of Digital Strategy

Digital Strategy2 Comments

At the Digital Marketing and Media Summit 2009, EURO RSCG’s Paul Hutchins and Sony Australia’s Michelle Hall revealed the guiding principles they abided to when developing and implementing Sony’s “The Quantum Code” promotion.

  1. Make new technology relevant
  2. Apply the KISS principle
  3. Plan, plan and then plan some more
  4. Be prepared to adapt and update on the fly
  5. It’s not just local but global
  6. Be prepared to relinquish control
  7. Don’t underestimate your consumers
  8. Make sure the experience is seamless and always the close the loop – have an exit strategy

By sticking to these guiding principles, they were able to a launch a highly engaging digital campaign that captured the imagination of discerning Bond-loving techies around the world – with nearly zero ATL support!

Lucky for you, the 8 guiding principles are not tied into any one brand and can be applied to any digital marketing strategy.

Use it wisely.

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